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In Utramque Partem Argumentative Essays

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  • Borneo’s forests and culture is fast disappearing. One way to raise awareness is through Cultural expression and Dance and communicating to people the Importance of developing this art form. Based in Palangkaraya, Central Kalimantan, this dance academy promotes traditional Dayak dancing. Local dancer and teacher, Ibu Siti Habibah, runs the academy. Siti provides traditional dance and music instruction to young Dayak children. Plans are to expand this program to the more remote villages as a way for the children to express their culture and keep the Dayak dance tradition alive.

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    Our mission:

    Our Roadmap starts with our mission, which is enduring. It declares our purpose as a dance academy and serves as the standard against which we weigh our actions and decisions. (1) To create more Dance tutors. (2) To inspire moments of optimism and happiness. (3) To create value and conserve Dayak traditions.

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